An Introduction To Adult Stem Cells

Cells

I’m sure you’ve already heard about Stem Cells. Maybe you saw a news story or a read a news article or saw the Presidential address. They are the most widely publicized scientific discovery today and with good reason. How about Embryonic Stem Cells? They have created a great deal of controversy and with good reason. The lure of what Embryonic Stem Cells can do for our health has led to ethical issues surrounding such things as embryo harvesting. One thing remains, Stem Cells represent the future of Health and Wellness as we know it. And they are here to stay.

So what are they?

Stem Cells are master cells, meaning that they can generate many, if not all, of the different tissues of the body. They are with us our entire lives and are released naturally from the bone marrow, but like everything else, the process behind their release slows down with age. When there aren’t as many stem cells in the blood stream, the body can’t repair and renew itself as it once did. These master cells are still contained in the bone marrow in the millions, just not being released as they should.

As this natural release occurs we need to concern ourselves with finding ways to reverse it. The good news is there are 4 things we can do.

Exercise – as we already know, regular exercise is vital to good health

Proper breathing – deep breathing oxygenates the blood and tissues

Good Nutrition – we need nutrients to nourish and water to flush toxins from our cells

Stem cell enhancers – a new product category set to become what antioxidants are today

Stem Cells are the only known source for rebuilding the body and renewing health by restoring lost or degraded cells. They have already been used to help treat things such as Leukemia, AIDS, Alzheimer’s Disease and multiple sclerosis.

They have been used to form new cartilage, grow new corneas to restore sight to the blind, as treatments for stroke victims, and several groups are using adult stem cells with patients to repair damage after heart attacks.

Early clinical trials have also shown initial success in patient treatments for Parkinson